ARCTIC CHRONOBIOLOGY PLOS BIOLOGY ESSAY REACHES OVER 7500 READS IN ONE MONTH


 
Congratulations to David Hazlerigg (UiT, ACP) and Nick Tyler (UiT, Centre for Saami studies) for publication of their essay: “Activity patterns in mammals: Circadian dominance challenged” in the prestigious journal PLoS Biology. In just one month this essay has attracted over 7500 reads!

Abstract
The evidence that diel patterns of physiology and behaviour in mammals are governed by circadian ‘clocks’ is based almost entirely on studies of nocturnal rodents. The emergent circadian paradigm, however, neglects the roles of energy metabolism and alimentary function (feeding and digestion) as determinants of activity pattern. The temporal control of activity varies widely across taxa, and ungulates, microtine rodents, and insectivores provide examples in which circadian timekeeping is vestigial. The nocturnal rodent/human paradigm of circadian organisation is unhelpful when considering the broader manifestation of activity patterns in mammals.

Article by Shona Wood & David Hazlerigg
Photos: Bob van Oort and Shona Wood

 

 

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